Iowa City Housing Information

Strategic Plan:
General Format

 

I. Development of the 2001-2006 Consolidation Plan (CITY STEPS) II. Housing & Homeless Needs Assesment III. Housing Market Analysis IV. Strategic Plan V. Certifications VI. Appendices
A. General Format B. Affordable Housing C. Homelessness D. Other Special Needs E. Non-Housing Community Development Plan F. Barriers to Affordable Housing
G. Lead Based Paint Hazzards H. Anti-poverty Plan and Strategies I. Institutional Structure J. Coordination K. Public Housing Resident L. Monitoring Standards and Procedures
1. General Priorities for Allocating Investment 2. Basis for Assigning the Priority 3. Obstacle to Meeting Under Served Needs

IV A. GENERAL FORMAT OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN

The strategic plan is a general overview of Iowa City's plan for housing, jobs and services for low-income residents for the next five years. This section of the Consolidated Plan (CITY STEPS) will show the types of projects or activities that we envision taking place, initiated by the City or by other organizations. Since this is a five-year overview, the numbers relating to units, households and funds are rough estimates (based upon the past uses of federal funds).

1. General Priorities for Allocating Investment

Iowa City expects to receive a total of approximately $1,620,000 in federal funds (CDBG & HOME) annually. Other federal funds for specific programs, like the Housing Choice Voucher Program is already designated by the federal government for a specific use (rent assistance for this example). The City has established a citizen-oriented method for allocating CDBG and HOME funds. The Housing and Community Development Commission (HCDC) is a nine member citizen advisory commission to the City Council. As funding becomes available, annually, this commission hears proposals from numerous local organizations (both non-profit and for-profits) and the City itself. Once the presentations are heard this commission ranks each proposal according to pre-determined factors (see Ranking Criteria in Appendix 5). The most important factor is "addressing a priority need identified in the CITY STEPS Plan". Projects requesting funding must address one of these needs, and since funding is limited, the proposals meeting a "HIGH" or "MEDIUM" priority need are given the highest rating. Once the projects are ranked, the commission makes their funding recommendation to the City Council. The City Council reviews the recommendation and makes revisions, as needed, and then votes to adopt the funding allocations of CDBG and HOME monies as part of the one year Action Plan.

a. Geographically

Iowa City is a fairly homogeneous community with no areas of heavy low income or minority concentrations or areas with concentrations of deteriorated housing. The residential central city area surrounding the University of Iowa has a preponderance of student rental housing, but is not an area of concentration of low income families. Because of this, there is no defined plan for allocating CDBG and HOME funds geographically. Since CDBG and HOME projects are often initiated by a number of different organizations, these federal funds are used throughout the community. Likewise, the City's Housing Rehabilitation Program serves citizens on a citywide basis and distributes the assistance accordingly. All service programs are based on individual need and are not allocated geographically.

b. Among Priority Needs as Identified in HUD Table IV.1 and Table IV.3

HUD Tables IV.1 and IV.3 shows that there are a number of needs with "HIGH" priorities in each of the categories (housing, homeless, public facilities, and public services). The City does not use set-asides for any of these categories. However, federal regulations prohibit more than 15 percent of CDBG funds being used for public services. Estimating the public service expenditures annually is fairly simple given the federal restrictions (CDBG funds x .15 = $ for public services). This calculation gives us an estimate of $145,000 annually that may be used to fund public service activities, based upon current CDBG funding levels. There are no limits or requirements for allocating funds in each of the other categories (housing, public facilities and economic development).

 

2. Basis for Assigning the Priority

In order to develop this plan and determine the community's needs citizen input was solicited. (A complete description of the development of the CITY STEPS Plan can be found in Section I.) This citizen input was the main force behind the priority rankings of the identified needs. A group, made up of six residents, formed the Priorities and Strategies Committee. Committee members attended the public meetings and discussed the community's needs with many organizations. As a result the Priorities and Strategies Committee assigned priority rankings of "HIGH", "MEDIUM", "LOW", and "NO SUCH NEED" to all of the various needs identified in this plan. These priorities will then be used by the HCDC and staff to rank proposed projects and make funding recommendations to the City Council.

These priority rankings are not absolute and are subject to change upon presentation of evidence that a need does exist and the level of that need is well documented. In general, "low" priority rankings indicate that existing services are adequately meeting current demand, or that no specific needs have been identified at this time. It is also important to remember that these are not the needs of the City as a whole, but those of its low-income residents only. Thus, Water Improvements and Parking have a "Low" priority ranking as far as the low-income population alone is concerned, but these improvements are a "high" priority for the City as a whole.

3. Obstacles to Meeting Under Served Needs

Available funding is the most apparent obstacle. Most of the services that are needed by low income persons are available in Iowa City; if more funding were available existing services could be expanded to meet the needs of the community. A second, less apparent, obstacle to meeting lower income residents' needs has to do with community attitudes. Many persons support services or programs designed to help the needy, but do not want "low income housing" or multi-family housing in their neighborhood. (See also Section IV.F.)

Continuum of Care: Gaps Analysis - Individuals
Beds/UnitsEstimated
Needs
Current
Inventory
Unmet Need/ GapRelative
Priority
    Emergency Shelter
73 55 18High
    Transitional Housing
603030High
    Permanent Housing (supportive)
38129190High
    Total
22385128
 
Estimated Supportive Services Slots
    Job Training
12020100High
    Case Management
180 8496High
    Substance Abuse Treatment
180 13545High
    Mental Health Care
120 2040High
    Housing Placement
180 80100Medium
    Life Skills Training
228 115113High
 
Estimated Sub-Populations
    Chronic Substance Abusers
180 45135High
    Seriously Mentally Ill
72 2052High
    Dually-Diagnosed
60 2040Medium
    Veterans
722250Medium
    Persons with HIV/AIDS
23 518High
    Victims of Domestic Violence
60 2040High
    Youth
501832High
 
Continuum of Care: Gaps Analysis - Persons in Families with Children
 
Beds/UnitsEstimated
Needs
Current
Inventory
Unmet Need/
Gap
Relative
Priority
    Emergency Shelter
3348(-15)*High
    Transitional Housing
1013665High
    Permanent Housing (supportive)
30030 High
    Total
1344886
 
Estimated Supportive Services Slots
    Job Training
611546High
    Case Management
461531Medium
    Child Care
15727130High
    Substance Abuse Treatment
453411High
    Mental Health Care
921082High
    Housing Placement
16740127Medium
    Life Skills Training
1100401060High
 
Estimated Sub-Populations
    Chronic Substance Abusers
461531High
    Seriously Mentally Ill
18513High
    Dually-Diagnosed
15312High
    Veterans
18513Medium
    Persons with HIV/AIDS
523High
    Victims of Domestic Violence
15411High

Special Needs/Non-Homeless
 
Sub-PopulationsPriority Need   Estimated $
    Elderly
MediumUnknown
    Frail Elderly
High Unknown
    Severe Mental Illness
HighUnknown
    Developmentally Disabled
High Unknown
    Physically Disabled
HighUnknown
    Persons with Alcohol/Other Drug Addiction
High Unknown
    Persons with HIV/AIDS
HighUnknown

 

*Inventory exists at DVIP, however, funds for staffing do not allow for maximum utilization of the facility.

 

 

HUD Table IV.1

LISTING OF PRIORITY NEEDS

PRIORITY HOUSING NEEDS

(households)

Priority Need Level

High, Medium, Low,

No Such Need

1990

ESTIMATED

UNITS

1990 ESTIMATED

DOLLARS NEEDED

TO ADDRESS

 

0-30%

31-50%

51-80%

   

Renter

Small

Cost Burden > 30%

H

H

M

1,088

20,200,000

   

Cost Burden > 50%

H

H

M

507

9,400,000

   

Physical Defects

L

L

L

185

1,850,000

   

Overcrowded**

H

M

L

69

4,140,000

 

Large

Cost Burden > 30%

H

H

M

112

2,080,000

   

Cost Burden > 50%

H

H

M

9

170,000

   

Physical Defects

L

L

L

35

350,000

   

Overcrowded**

H

M

L

7

420,000

 

Elderly

Cost Burden > 30%

M

M

M

304

5,650,000

   

Cost Burden > 50%

M

M

M

121

2,250,000

   

Physical Defects

L

L

L

10

100,000

   

Overcrowded**

M

M

L

19

1,140,000

Owner

Cost Burden > 30%

H

M

M

955

8,600,000

 

Cost Burden > 50%

H

M

M

263

4,730,000

 

Physical Defects

H

H

M

2337

23,370,000

 

Overcrowded**

L

L

L

75

1,400,000

 

 

PRIORITY HOMELESS NEEDS

Priority Need Level

High, Medium, Low, No Such Need

ESTIMATED

DOLLARS NEEDED

TO ADDRESS

Outreach Assessment

Families

Individuals

w/ Special Needs

600,000

 

M

M

M

 

Emergency Shelters

Families

Individuals

w/ Special Needs

1,250,000

 

H

H

M

 

Transitional Shelters

Families

Individuals

w/ Special Needs

3,250,000

 

H

H

H

 

Permanent Supportive Housing

Families

Individuals

w/ Special Needs

1,250,000

 

N

N

H

 

Permanent Housing

Families

Individuals

w/ Special Needs

6,510,000

 

H

H

N

 

Information on this table is based upon statistics from the 1990 U.S. Census

** NOTE: New Construction of multi-family units

Table IV.2

CITY OF IOWA CITY FY2001-FY2006
ESTIMATED FEDERAL ASSISTANCE (CDBG AND HOME FUNDING)

Tenant Based Rental Assistance

50 Households Assisted

$ 180,000

Rental Housing New Construction

125 Units

$1,500,000

Rental Housing Acq./Rehabilitation

50 Units

$ 750,000

Homebuyer Assistance

55 Households

$ 165,000

Owner-Occupied Housing Rehab

300 Units

$1,620,000

Homeless Shelters

---

$ 335,000

Public Facilities

---

$1,200,000

Public Services

---

$ 725,000

Economic Development

---

$ 375,000

Other Activities

---

$ 250,000

Administration and Planning

CDBG and HOME

$1,000,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURES  

$8,100,000*

* This table represents the amount of funding the City of Iowa City expects to receive from federal sources (CDBG and HOME) and program income in fiscal years 2001-2006. The activities and estimates of expenditures shown in the table are based upon the past uses of these funds and the strategies highlighted in this plan.

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